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    Ghana 50th Anniversary Celebrations – Seattle

    Ghana’s 50th Independence CelebrationÂ

    Date: Sat., March 3, 2007
    Time: 5:00 PM – 12:00 Midnight
    Place: King County Aquatic Center
    650 S.W. Campus Drive.
    Federal Way, WA 98023
    Donation: $40/person or $60/couple
    $45/person @ the door
    Children 16 and under–Free
    Dress Code: Formal or Traditional
    Keynote Speaker, Dinner, Cultural Events, & DJ Music
    For tickets contact Joe Bervell: 425-750-1103
    Sponsor: Ghanaian Association of Greater Seattle

    Living without my phone

    I almost want to say that I can’t live without my phone but that would be ridiculous. Of course, I can live without my phone. I just wouldn’t feel complete. Two Mondays past, I exposed my phone to the elements; rain, slush and cold, for about 2 hours.

    It flickered on and off for a while and later died; faced with the prospect of losing my phone I had a mini panic attack. Surely, I can live without my phone but do I want to?

    I once read that no one loves their phone completely, there’s always something you’d like to change or add to your phone. This is true; my phone is far from perfect but it brought me so much joy, convenience and ease I feel it’s perfect enough.

    I’ve had my I-mate Jamin (aka HTP Prophet, Qtek S200) for almost a year now. It’s my first ever pocket PC.

    Prior to this, I had an Innostream 55, a very cute little phone, great conversation piece… but not so great phone. It shipped with an application called Lady Scheduler and a slew of other wacky stuff. The battery got wonky on me and I got tired of carrying a cell phone, MP3 player and a PDA.

    I did a little research and opted for Jamin (ok, I liked the name!)

    I won’t bore you with the details, there’re lots of reviews on the internets.

    First thing I did was to get a 2GB SD card; I have so much awesome crap on there it’s daunting.

      The Good:

    • My songs, podcasts and videos on the go
    • WIFI
    • EDGE
    • Word, Excel, PDF viewer
    • Outlook with calendar, contacts etc.
    • MSN Messenger, Skype and any other IM type compatible with WM5
    • 2 Mega pixel camera – Most of the pictures on this blog were taken with the phone’s camera
    • Bluetooth
    • Voice dialing for contacts and applications
    • A slew of downloadable third party applications
    • Charging via USB cable
    • OK battery life considering all it does
      The Bad:

    • Sluggish (200 MHz CPU), not as fast as I’d like it to be, although you get used to it
    • Poor quality speakers, I barely use this, I normally hook it up to my Bose computer speakers
    • 2.5MM headset jack, I have a 3.5MM converter, tragedy averted.
    • Camera lag and not so great night time pictures
    • Requires frequent resets to keep it sane

    That Monday, I took out the battery and the SD card, and laid it out to dry overnight. I put it back together in the morning and… viola! Like magic it worked.

    I appreciate my phone now more than ever, I wonder if there’re other people out there who feel the same way about their phones.

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    Festival Baobob

    Celebrating and showcasing the wealth of artistic talent in BCs fast-growing African community

    All events at the WISE Hall, 1882 Adanac (off Victoria Drive)
    
    
    FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2
    African Cabaret doors open 8 pm, show 9 pm
    Entertainment by animated Congolese storyteller, actor, musician, 
    dancer Jean Pierre Makosso; multi-talented Guinean percussionist and
    kora (harp-lute) player Kocassalé Dioubaté; the high energy Kokoma
    dance and drum performance ensemble, led by Maobong Oku from Nigeria; 
    and a rare solo performance by Guinean master-musician 
    and multiple Juno Award-winning artist 
    Alpha Yaya Diallo of the African Guitar Summit supergroup
     
    SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3
    Heart of the Baobab dinner 7 pm, show 8 pm
    Dinner (optional), prepared by the Nyala African restaurant, 
    followed by a performance on kora from master-musician Daniel Janke; 
    African dances from the young women of the Miyanda troupe; 
    and two full sets  of West African music, masks, storytelling, 
    and dance from Masabo,  helmed by athletic balafon 
    (marimba)-player Fana Soro
     
    FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16
    A Night in the Sahara doors open 8 pm, show 9 pm
    Sudanese music from five-piece band Sudan’da led 
    by oud (lute)-player Aladeen Abdalla; trance-inducing North African 
    rhythms and bellydancing with Egyptian drum-master Adel Awad and Sahara; 
    and the contemporary grooves of DJ Nils from the Beats without Borders 
    collective to take us dancing into the wee hours
     
    SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17
    African Carnival dinner 7 pm, show 8 pm
    Chef Hinda from Djibouti will serve tasty African tapas. 
    Storytelling from Nigerian actress, playwright, and yarnspinner Comfort Ero; 
    the irresistible rhythms of young Afro-Cuban drum and Zimbabwean 
    marimba ensemble Kutapira; and two full sets of dance music from
    Guinean groover Aboubacar Camara, his band Doundounba, plus special guests
    An African/Caribbean Jam or DJ will play out each night
    The WISE will have an all-ages license for these events
    Tickets $18 each show ($15 concessions)
    Pass for all 4 shows $55 (or $45)
    Available at Highlife Records - 1317 Commercial Drive
    SofiaBooks. - 450 West Hastings
    Banyen Books - 3608 West 4th Ave, and by phone at (604) 737 8858
    More info at http://www.zula.ca
    Festival Baobab is co-produced by Alliance Française de Vancouver, 
    the WISE Hall, Zula Productions, & Bluehouse